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Burden of Tendering Admissions When Identity is Disputed

In Burden of Proof, Evidence Law, Hearsay, Hearsay, Teaching Capsules, Theory and Principle, Theory and Principle by Peter SankoffLeave a Comment

Tendering admissions made by the defendant in a criminal case is easy – except when there is reason to dispute whether it was the defendant who actually made the statement. Then things can get complicated in a hurry. This Video Blog attempts to sift through some contradictory jurisprudence and provide a framework for admitting statements in these situations. If you …

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Burden of Proving Mental Disorder (10mins)

In Burden of Proof, Case Comments, Charter of Rights & Freedoms, Core Principles, Criminal Law, Evidence Law, NCRMD by Peter SankoffLeave a Comment

In this video blog, I examine the British Columbia Supreme Court’s decision in R. v. Eligu, 2016 BCSC 1487, which addresses a constitutional challenge to section 16(4) of the Criminal Code, the clause that requires applicant’s to prove a mental disorder defence. This case revisits the Supreme Court’s 1990 decision of R. v. Chaulk. If you enjoyed this post, do …

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Reversing the Burden of Proof in Summary Conviction Trials (10mins)

In Burden of Proof, Criminal Law, Defences, Evidence Law by Peter SankoffLeave a Comment

Talk about flying under the radar. Two days ago, the Supreme Court of Canada dismissed the case of R v Goleski from the bench. In the process, it confirmed that s. 794 imposes a burden of proof on the defendant to prove certain defences and excuses in EVERY summary conviction trial. This is not a good thing. To find out why, watch …