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Burden of Proving Mental Disorder (10mins)

In Burden of Proof, Case Comments, Charter of Rights & Freedoms, Core Principles, Criminal Law, Evidence Law, NCRMD by Peter SankoffLeave a Comment

In this video blog, I examine the British Columbia Supreme Court’s decision in R. v. Eligu, 2016 BCSC 1487, which addresses a constitutional challenge to section 16(4) of the Criminal Code, the clause that requires applicant’s to prove a mental disorder defence. This case revisits the Supreme Court’s 1990 decision of R. v. Chaulk. If you enjoyed this post, do …

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The Travis Vader Verdict (30mins)

In Case Comments, Case Comments, Charter of Rights & Freedoms, Criminal Law, Homicide, Mental Elements, Procedural Issues by Peter Sankoff1 Comment

Thirty Minutes! I promise not to go this long again, but there was a lot to say here, and a fair bit of legal complexity.  After Thomas J.’s stunning decision to convict Travis Vader using an unconstitutional section of the Criminal Code, most people are wondering, “what’s going to happen to the conviction?”  There are a lot of potential legal …

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Carter, The Assisted Dying Bill and Constitutional Remedies (15mins)

In Case Comments, Case Comments, Charter of Rights & Freedoms, Criminal Law by Peter SankoffLeave a Comment

In this video blog, I explain the impact of the Carter v Canada decision, which struck down the assisted suicide provision of the Criminal Code, but did so in an unusual way. The federal government is trying to enact legislation with an eye on June 6, when the SCC’s decision to “suspend” the declaration of invalidity expires.  What happens if …

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